Do you need an excellent outview of nature’s beauty? Imagine the pleasure you would derive if you stormed the SEMEBEACH HOTEL in the South West Region of Cameroon.

Standard

Light up your life & give yourself a resourceful treat by allowing the excellent services of SEME BEACH HOTEL to devour your body with optimum pleasure and satisfaction.The SEME BEACH HOTEL is a 3 star hotel in the South West Coastal city of Limbe with diverse offers such as the lodging facilities,restaurants, spa exxercises,event management…

The first global standard & exciting sight seeing resort and spa  in the South West Coastal city harbours 85 standard air conditionned rooms,14 Family apartments,17 High standing suites & 2 VIPs,3 Restaurants (buffets,gourmet’s meals,bar & grilled meat),3 meeting rooms,6 shops,Tour & Leisure office,well designed swimming pool,,a fish pond,a fitness hall,jacuzzi and other interesting offers that will give a paradise touch to your stay in limbe.

 These facilities put in place by the management seek to ameliorate the hotel business in Cameroon,with innovative concepts.These may go a long way to develop the tourism industry in this part of the Nation.

Besides,SEME BEACH HOTEL organises exceptional events to satisfy the customers’ expectations in brilliant exciting initiatives such the MISS BEACH concept,which aims to project the AFrican woman to the forefront in diverse aspects,while yet empower her for a challenging technological tomorrow.MISS BEACH is expected to sell the quality of SEME BEACH HOTEL’s luxurious services,made available to all classes of persons. Auditions for the 2012 edition of MISS BEACH kick off on April 7th 2011,running through the week,speculating the finals on May 14th,2012 at SEME BEACH HOTEL Limbe.

Contact  the Management by either dialing the following numbers:  + 237 77 93 45 46 / 77 93 45 49 / 77 93 45 5O / 77 74 94 46 / 97 11 52 92;Fax: (237) 77 99 12 30, write to semebeach@gmail.com or log into the www.semebeach.com for more details.

Advertisements

HEAD OF STATE’S END OF YEAR ADDRESS TO NATIONALS

Standard

HEAD OF STATE’S NEW YEAR MESSAGE TO THE NATION

31/12/2011Yaounde, 31 December 2011

Fellow Cameroonians, My dear compatriots,

Here we are on the threshold of the first phase of our “long march” towards becoming an emerging country.The recent presidential election has laid a solid foundation for this purpose. You voted for stability and peace, thus confirming your sound judgement and sense of responsibility. No matter what some people might have said, the poll was fair and reflected the will of the majority of our people who – I must emphasize – refused to heed calls for street protests. I take this opportunity to reaffirm that the dysfunctions noted and which, anyway, were not likely to cast doubt over the outcome of the election, will be corrected before the next election.

As I promised, the period now beginning will essentially be devoted to the stimulation of growth. By the way, we have no choice. Either we move on and have reason for hope, or we mark time and our problems will only worsen. Indeed, it should be realized that, like most African countries, we are caught in a pursuit race between our development and our population growth. To win the race, we must implement the “new impetus” I proposed during the election campaign.
What have we lacked so far to revive our economy?

I believe that, in the past, government action suffered from a lack of the entrepreneurial approach and the administration from inactivity. We must overcome this inertia which has caused us so much harm.

Corruption is another insidious and dreadful enemy. It does not only cart off a huge chunk of public funds, but also causes delays in the implementation of projects which are indispensable for our country’s economic recovery. I have, on several occasions, said that we will continue to wage a relentless war against this scourge. The establishment of the Special Criminal Court, which will speed up the trial of pending cases and, hopefully, the refund of sums misappropriated, demonstrates our resolve in this regard.

In addition to the difficulties we have faced and continue to face in stimulating growth, I must, to be fair, mention those arising from the global context. Without dwelling on inequity in the terms of trade, structural adjustment constraints and the consequences of the recent economic and financial crisis, I believe I can, without distorting the truth, say that excessive deregulation, disruptions caused by speculation and the decrease in official development assistance have compounded the task of countries like ours.

The point here is not to look for excuses for our poor performance, but simply to recall the facts. If one can, legitimately, express disappointment at the effects of globalization, one might also get worried about the slow pace of ongoing negotiations within bodies such as the G8, the G20 and the WTO, negotiations whose avowed goal was to clean up the global economy and finance, to make world trade more equitable and ensure greater solidarity between the North and the South. But it can be seen that the problems of the western world, particularly sovereign debt, override those of developing countries.

Thus, we must increasingly rely on our own efforts and draw inspiration from the experience of emerging countries. To achieve this goal, I believe that we should consider recovery as a genuine national cause. All our economic players should mobilize, with the support of public authorities, to channel their efforts towards the one and only objective of ensuring Cameroon’s economic take-off, in the vein of the new Asian “dragons” some thirty years ago. This economic “patriotism” could marshal all the country’s vital forces. In saying this, I am thinking particularly of Cameroonian women whose dynamism is widely acknowledged, but also of the youth who, despite their competences, have difficulty working their way up to positions of responsibility.

We have the necessary assets to achieve this great vision.

We now have a roadmap, the Growth and Employment Strategy Paper, which sets the objectives for this decade, and our budget programming framework, which, in 2012, will hinge on efforts to further improve public financial management, particularly through the judicious collection of budgetary revenues and improvement of the quality of spending. Fiscal and customs incentives will boost investment. In the same spirit, the 2012 public investment budget has been increased significantly. It will be allocated primarily to two major sectors: infrastructure and production sub-sectors. These measures, among others, reflect the State’s determination to act energetically to accelerate our economic recovery.

I do not have, I believe, to dwell on our natural resources, which are well known. I will only recall the main ones:

– Agriculture, with vast expanses of land and favourable climatic conditions. It should be remembered that in Ebolowa I presented a brief outline of the “agrarian revolution” which must be launched at all costs during this seven-year term;

– Mineral resources, particularly iron, bauxite and cobalt, which will soon be exploited;

– Energy resources, hydroelectricity, oil and gas, the exploitation of which is underway or planned.

I will not fail to mention our numerous, hardworking and well-trained human resources who should find employment with the implementation of our major projects and acceleration of the professionalization of education.
Will these assets suffice to achieve our great vision? The question is worth asking.

Indeed, to take advantage of these favourable factors, we need to question the behavioural patterns responsible for our deficiencies or our failures. The foremost among them is the quest for personal benefit at the expense of the general interest which ought to be the golden rule of public service. The Supreme State Audit should be inflexible in this regard. Similarly, bad habits such as nepotism, influence peddling and fraud, which are widespread, should be eradicated.

Furthermore, we should not hide the fact that the “new impetus” we intend to spearhead will require of State services as well as civil society considerable efforts and devotion. This is the type of patriotism I mentioned earlier on because it involves nothing less than getting Cameroon out of the category of developing countries and raising it to the level of new emerging countries. It should be acknowledged that it is a long haul.

We have also to reckon with global economic trends which are now full of uncertainties… Against this backdrop, we have no choice but to accelerate the development of our resources by launching our major projects as soon as possible. To finance these projects, we will, besides our public investment budget, have recourse to national savings, that is borrowing, international or other donors, and friendly countries.

I will not dwell on the major projects which I elaborated on before the National Assembly during my swearing-in ceremony, and which are included in the new Government’s agenda. I count on this government – which I consider as a “government with a mission” – to devote all its energy and competences to the implementation of these projects. I will see to that personally.

My dear compatriots,

I am well aware that the efforts I am asking you to make to support our common vision should not be without compensation. In fact, it is about time you reap the benefits of the sacrifices you have made.

If we succeed in vigorously reviving our economy, as I believe, the employment situation will ease significantly. The social strata most affected by unemployment, especially the youth, could gain access to employment and see their lot improve. We will do everything we can to achieve this objective. On the other hand, the State will continue to create openings into the public service as far as it can.

My other priority, as you know, is to improve the living conditions of our people which are not worthy of a country like ours. In this regard, the revival of growth should give us a greater leeway. Be it health, education, housing, social security, access to electricity and drinking water, rest assured that the commitments I made will be honoured as far as possible.

Fellow Cameroonians, My dear compatriots,

That is a summary of the terms of the pact of confidence which I sealed with you on 3 November before the National Assembly. We are thus committed to making Cameroon an exemplary Republic, a Nation that is respected in the world, a fair State that ensures equal opportunities, a country where national wealth will be equally distributed.

This challenge is undoubtedly one of the most important we have had to face since the advent of democracy in our country. Time has come to decide whether we want to summon all our strength to revive our economy and provide adequate living conditions for the majority of our people.

For my part, I am convinced that together we can succeed. If, as I believe, I can count on you as you can count on me, I have no doubt that we will succeed.

Before I conclude, I would like to say that the fiftieth anniversary of our reunification, which took place, as you are aware, on 1 October 1961, will be celebrated with all the necessary solemnity. Because the anniversary of this historic event had to take place at the same time as the presidential election, we could not celebrate it when we would have liked. It will take place in Buea, as soon as possible, with the desired dignity and fervour because we should always remember that reunification was our Nation’s first step towards its unity.

My Dear compatriots,

It is now time for me to extend to you all, my most sincere wishes for health and happiness in the New Year.

Happy New Year 2012.

Long live Cameroon!

Paul BIYA announces a dignified and solemn celebration of the reunification in Buea,in his December 31st address to the citizens.

Standard

 The Head of State has called on Cameroonians at all level to put their efforts together so as to transform the numerous potentials in our country so that the living conditions can improve so that our economy can take off. President Paul BIYA was speaking as he addressed his traditional New Year message to the Cameroonian people on 31 December 2011

 

 Fellow Cameroonians,

 My dear compatriots,

Here we are on the threshold of the first phase of our “long march” towards becoming an emerging country.

The recent presidential election has laid a solid foundation for this purpose. You voted for stability and peace, thus confirming your sound judgement and sense of responsibility. No matter what some people might have said, the poll was fair and reflected the will of the majority of our people who – I must emphasize – refused to heed calls for street protests. I take this opportunity to reaffirm that the dysfunctions noted and which, anyway, were not likely to cast doubt over the outcome of the election, will be corrected before the next election.

As I promised, the period now beginning will essentially be devoted to the stimulation of growth. By the way, we have no choice. Either we move on and have reason for hope, or we mark time and our problems will only worsen. Indeed, it should be realized that, like most African countries, we are caught in a pursuit race between our development and our population growth. To win the race, we must implement the “new impetus” I proposed during the election campaign.

What have we lacked so far to revive our economy?

 I believe that, in the past, government action suffered from a lack of the entrepreneurial approach and the administration from inactivity. We must overcome this inertia which has caused us so much harm.

Corruption is another insidious and dreadful enemy. It does not only cart off a huge chunk of public funds, but also causes delays in the implementation of projects which are indispensable for our country’s economic recovery. I have, on several occasions, said that we will continue to wage a relentless war against this scourge. The establishment of the Special Criminal Court, which will speed up the trial of pending cases and, hopefully, the refund of sums misappropriated, demonstrates our resolve in this regard.

 In addition to the difficulties we have faced and continue to face in stimulating growth, I must, to be fair, mention those arising from the global context. Without dwelling on inequity in the terms of trade, structural adjustment constraints and the consequences of the recent economic and financial crisis, I believe I can, without distorting the truth, say that excessive deregulation, disruptions caused by speculation and the decrease in official development assistance have compounded the task of countries like ours.

 The point here is not to look for excuses for our poor performance, but simply to recall the facts. If one can, legitimately, express disappointment at the effects of globalization, one might also get worried about the slow pace of ongoing negotiations within bodies such as the G8, the G20 and the WTO, negotiations whose avowed goal was to clean up the global economy and finance, to make world trade more equitable and ensure greater solidarity between the North and the South. But it can be seen that the problems of the western world, particularly sovereign debt, override those of developing countries.

 Thus, we must increasingly rely on our own efforts and draw inspiration from the experience of emerging countries. To achieve this goal, I believe that we should consider recovery as a genuine national cause. All our economic players should mobilize, with the support of public authorities, to channel their efforts towards the one and only objective of ensuring Cameroon’s economic take-off, in the vein of the new Asian “dragons” some thirty years ago. This economic “patriotism” could marshal all the country’s vital forces. In saying this, I am thinking particularly of Cameroonian women whose dynamism is widely acknowledged, but also of the youth who, despite their competences, have difficulty working their way up to positions of responsibility.

We have the necessary assets to achieve this great vision. We now have a roadmap, the Growth and Employment Strategy Paper, which sets the objectives for this decade, and our budget programming framework, which, in 2012, will hinge on efforts to further improve public financial management, particularly through the judicious collection of budgetary revenues and improvement of the quality of spending. Fiscal and customs incentives will boost investment. In the same spirit, the 2012 public investment budget has been increased significantly. It will be allocated primarily to two major sectors: infrastructure and production sub-sectors. These measures, among others, reflect the State’s determination to act energetically to accelerate our economic recovery.

 I do not have, I believe, to dwell on our natural resources, which are well known. I will only recall the main ones:

– Agriculture, with vast expanses of land and favourable climatic conditions. It should be remembered that in Ebolowa I presented a brief outline of the “agrarian revolution” which must be launched at all costs during this seven-year term;

 – Mineral resources, particularly iron, bauxite and cobalt, which will soon be exploited;

 – Energy resources, hydroelectricity, oil and gas, the exploitation of which is underway or planned.

 I will not fail to mention our numerous, hardworking and well-trained human resources who should find employment with the implementation of our major projects and acceleration of the professionalization of education.

Will these assets suffice to achieve our great vision? The question is worth asking.

 Indeed, to take advantage of these favourable factors, we need to question the behavioural patterns responsible for our deficiencies or our failures. The foremost among them is the quest for personal benefit at the expense of the general interest which ought to be the golden rule of public service. The Supreme State Audit should be inflexible in this regard. Similarly, bad habits such as nepotism, influence peddling and fraud, which are widespread, should be eradicated.

Furthermore, we should not hide the fact that the “new impetus” we intend to spearhead will require of State services as well as civil society considerable efforts and devotion. This is the type of patriotism I mentioned earlier on because it involves nothing less than getting Cameroon out of the category of developing countries and raising it to the level of new emerging countries. It should be acknowledged that it is a long haul.

We have also to reckon with global economic trends which are now full of uncertainties… Against this backdrop, we have no choice but to accelerate the development of our resources by launching our major projects as soon as possible. To finance these projects, we will, besides our public investment budget, have recourse to national savings, that is borrowing, international or other donors, and friendly countries.

 I will not dwell on the major projects which I elaborated on before the National Assembly during my swearing-in ceremony, and which are included in the new Government’s agenda. I count on this government – which I consider as a “government with a mission” – to devote all its energy and competences to the implementation of these projects. I will see to that personally.

My dear compatriots,

I am well aware that the efforts I am asking you to make to support our common vision should not be without compensation. In fact, it is about time you reap the benefits of the sacrifices you have made.

 If we succeed in vigorously reviving our economy, as I believe, the employment situation will ease significantly. The social strata most affected by unemployment, especially the youth, could gain access to employment and see their lot improve. We will do everything we can to achieve this objective. On the other hand, the State will continue to create openings into the public service as far as it can.

My other priority, as you know, is to improve the living conditions of our people which are not worthy of a country like ours. In this regard, the revival of growth should give us a greater leeway. Be it health, education, housing, social security, access to electricity and drinking water, rest assured that the commitments I made will be honoured as far as possible.

Fellow Cameroonians,

 My dear compatriots,

That is a summary of the terms of the pact of confidence which I sealed with you on 3 November before the National Assembly. We are thus committed to making Cameroon an exemplary Republic, a Nation that is respected in the world, a fair State that ensures equal opportunities, a country where national wealth will be equally distributed.

This challenge is undoubtedly one of the most important we have had to face since the advent of democracy in our country. Time has come to decide whether we want to summon all our strength to revive our economy and provide adequate living conditions for the majority of our people.

For my part, I am convinced that together we can succeed. If, as I believe, I can count on you as you can count on me, I have no doubt that we will succeed.

 Before I conclude, I would like to say that the fiftieth anniversary of our reunification, which took place, as you are aware, on 1 October 1961, will be celebrated with all the necessary solemnity. Because the anniversary of this historic event had to take place at the same time as the presidential election, we could not celebrate it when we would have liked. It will take place in Buea, as soon as possible, with the desired dignity and fervour because we should always remember that reunification was our Nation’s first step towards its unity.

My Dear compatriots,

It is now time for me to extend to you all, my most sincere wishes for health and happiness in the New Year.

Happy New Year 2012.

Long live Cameroon!

The Life of Celebrity,Superstar & Spokesperson of the Nutrisystem DIET,Janet JACKSON

Standard

Who is Janet JACKSON?

An icon, a trendsetter, a businessperson, a multi-gifted artist: songwriter/producer/singer/actor/dancer. Janet burst onto the scene with her record setting album, “Control.” Today she possesses an unprecedented list of achievements, and remains in the forefront of her craft, a true inspiration. As an artist, Janet excites, enlightens, leads, and embraces her fans with insights into life’s meaning… and our deepest feelings. Janet is ranked as one of the top ten best-selling artists in the history of contemporary music. Her musical style, choreography, lyrical exploration, and self awareness has made her one of the top artists of our time as well as a leading influence on the upcoming stars of tomorrow.

Through words and actions, she has set an example of generosity, of empowerment, of tolerance, and helped to lead efforts addressing some of society’s greatest challenges. Born Janet Damita Jo Jackson in Gary, Indiana, she has accumulated the success and the stature to be addressed by just her first name, Janet.

Janet began her career at the young age of seven when she appeared at the MGM in Las Vegas with her family in 1973. This debut and her appearances beginning at the age of nine on her family’s variety show, The Jacksons, lead her to starring and supporting roles on hit sitcoms such as “Good Times,” “Diff’rent Strokes” and “Fame.”

At fourteen she signed her first recording deal and launched the career that would change the history and direction of performance art and music. Her first two albums, “Janet Jackson” and “Dream Street” were just the beginning. Placing acting on the back burner Janet was able to focus on her passion for music. It wasn’t until her third album, “Control” (1986) that she began to break records and set standards.

“Control” brought Janet into the collaborative mix of Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis: a relationship that created a musical fusion of pop, r&b, soul, dance, jazz, rock and rap that continues today. The new feisty sound of Janet brought accolades and praise that had not been seen before and cemented her in music history. “Control” won four American Music Awards out of twelve nominations – a record that she still holds – and was nominated for an Album of the Year Grammy. “Control” was influential in expanding and developing the art of music video performance.

Her fourth album “Janet Jackson’s Rhythm Nation 1814” took a new look at musical integrity and the responsibilities an artist has to the audience. “I just want my music and my dance to catch the audience’s attention, and to hold it long enough for them to listen to the lyrics and what we’re saying,” said Janet of the new direction. “Rhythm Nation 1814” was a socially conscious driven album that focused on the changes or lack there of occurring in society. The album’s lyrical content targeted injustice, illiteracy, crime, drugs, and racial intolerance, all of which was done to a slamming beat that kept audiences intrigued and dancing. Janet Jackson’s “Rhythm Nation 1814” is the only album ever to launch number one hits on the Billboard Hot 100 in three separate calendar years “Rhythm Nation” (1989), “Miss You Much,” (1989) “Escapade” (1990), “Black Cat” (1990), and “Love will Never Do (Without You)” (1991). It also brought Janet her first Grammy Award for Best Long Form Music Video for “Rhythm Nation 1814.”

In 1993 Janet released her fifth album, “janet.” which immediately shot to number one and reinvented Janet Jackson into Janet (period). “Control” was about growing up, “Rhythm Nation 1814” looked at social responsibility and “janet.” unleashed a sexual being with adult lyrics and swinging beats. The album became notorious and will forever hold a place in history for it’s Rolling Stone cover shot of a topless Janet. “janet.” brought her a second Grammy Award for the single, “That’s the Way Love Goes” and her first Golden Globe and Academy Award Nomination for the ballad, “Again” which was featured in the film, “Poetic Justice.” “Poetic Justice” re-launched Janet’s foray into acting and placed her in her first feature film role. She starred opposite Regina King and hip hop sensation Tupac Shakur.

Celebrating ten years following the release of her ground-breaking album, “Control,” “Design of a Decade” featured hits from “Control,” “Rhythm Nation 1814,” “janet.,” and two previously unreleased songs, “Runaway” and “Twenty Foreplay.”

Janet followed with “The Velvet Rope,” which continued her emotional exploration through music. Lyrically raw and filled with internal reflection, the album is considered to be Janet’s most introspective work that illustrates the ins and outs of her private thoughts, dreams and desires.

In the box office smash, “Nutty Professor II: The Klumps,” Janet made her second feature film appearance as Denise Gaines, opposite Academy Award Nominee Eddie Murphy. “Nutty Professor II” became her second film to open at number one at the box office. Janet also co-wrote and performed the song, “Doesn’t Really Matter,” the lead single from the film, which entered the number one position on the Billboard Hot 100 and became her first number one of the new century. The song was featured in her seventh album “All for You,” which came out the following year and for which Janet received another Grammy for Best Dance Recording.

A chameleon of performance Janet is widely known and admired for award winning music videos. Janet is the only artist having Grammy nominations spanning the Dance, Pop, Rap, Rock, and R&B categories. She has accumulated 5 Grammy’s, multiple MTV Awards, Billboard Music Awards, and Soul Train Music Awards to name a few. A highly regarded performer, her concerts are stunning shows that stimulate the mind, eyes, and the soul. Intense choreography skilled to perfection has been synonymous with Janet.

In 2001, MTV presented Janet with the inaugural MTV ICON Award solidifying her accomplishments and affect on pop culture. Musical artists such as Destiny’s Child, NSYNC, Outkast, Usher and Pink were enlisted to recreate the music videos and performances of her classic hits in honor of her work, influence and overall impact in the arena of music. The title of ICON was and continues to be hers.

Always, self-examining and open, Janet throws herself into every album. Her eighth studio album “Damita Jo” explored the extremes of sexuality. Janet followed up with “20 Y.O.” which reunited her with long time collaborators Jam/Lewis and brought in producer Jermaine Dupri to add an extra edge to the album. “20 Y.O.” celebrated her 20 years in the music industry and referenced back to the music that was created on “Control,” “Janet Jackson’s Rhythm Nation 1814,” and “janet.”

In Janet’s third feature film, “Why Did I Get Married?,” she starred opposite Tyler Perry. Janet received an Image Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a feature motion picture. The film was yet another number one opener at the box office. Shortly after the films release, she put out her tenth studio album “Discipline,” which reflected upon her personal battle with “discipline.” As one of the defining aspects of her career, Janet addresses the word, the meaning, and it’s affect on her as an artist and a person.

Janet’s album, “Discipline,” again served as a forum for Janet to reveal more about herself. “The album expresses what I need to express at this moment of my life,” she said. “It says that discipline, rather than being a problem, can bring pleasure. Discipline is a key to freedom. Discipline allows me—allows all of us—to focus. And the focus must be on thoughts and feelings that nourish our physical and spiritual lives.”

Janet supported the “Discipline” album with her fifth concert tour—the “Rock Witchu Tour.” Described as a “high-voltage performance,” Janet proved again her status as the consummate performer, providing fans with an extravaganza featuring all of her hits, non-stop choreography and a cutting-edge production.

Janet released her “Number Ones” album, her second greatest hits compilation, in 2009. The double-disc album featured Janet’s 34 number one hit singles, spanning various music charts across North America, Europe, Australia, New Zealand, Japan and South Africa. Additionally, the “Number Ones” album included Janet’s new single, “Make Me,” which became her 34th number one single and nineteenth number one hit on the Billboard Hot Dance Club Songs chart.

In 2010, JANET honored her brother Michael’s legacy and supported the people of Haiti by joining over 80 artists who collaborated to record “We Are the World 25 for Haiti,” the classic 1985 charity anthem re-imagined by Lionel Richie and Quincy Jones to support the earthquake relief efforts. “We Are The World 25 For Haiti” premiered during the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympic Games Opening Ceremony and is now an international #1 download on iTunes. Proceeds from the charity single continue to support the healing and rebuilding of Haiti.

Janet continues to focus on speaking out and giving back. Several of her tours have raised money for charities such as the Cities in Schools, and America’s Promise. She has supported the Watts Willowbrook Boys & Girls Club of America, the Starlight Foundation, the Make-A-Wish Foundation, A Place Called Home providing after school programs in South Central LA, the American Foundation for AIDS Research, S.O.S. Children’s Villages in South Africa, Cartier’s Love Bracelet Program benefiting OCNA and sponsored an Airlift of Food and Medical supplies to famine-stricken Rwanda. Janet established the Rhythm Nation Scholarship with the UNCF and has assisted countless students striving to meet their educational goals. Most recently, Janet chaired amfAR’s gala charity event in Milan that raised more than a million dollars for AIDS research. “This battle needs all of us to be brave warriors,” Janet said during the dinner and dance organized by the Foundation for AIDS Research. Janet also traveled recently to Abu Dhabi to support the fresh2o charity at the star studded F1 Grand Prix Ball. Money raised at the event enables provision of clean water for drinking and sanitation purposes globally.

She has been honored with many Humanitarian Awards due to her intense dedication to helping others. Recent honors, reflecting the range of her involvement in charitable and social causes, include the 2008 Humanitarian of the Year award from the Lisa Lopes Foundation, the 2008 Vanguard Award from GLAAD, and the 2004 Touching a Life Humanitarian and Philanthropic Award from the NBA. Janet’s efforts have also been recognized by AIDS Project LA, the Congress for Racial Equality, and by the NAACP with their Chairman’s Award.

Early next year, Janet will publish, “True You,” her first book, providing an intimate look at her life and how she has dealt with issues of self-esteem. Janet will reveal aspects not known before about her uniquely successful career not only in music but in television and motion pictures.

2010 saw Janet joining Tyler Perry once again for her fourth feature motion picture, “Why Did I Get Married Too?,” offering a compelling performance in the highly anticipated sequel. Janet also co-wrote and performed the film’s theme song, “Nothing.” Her performance of the song on the season finale of “American Idol” topped the chart on iTunes, resulting in her 35th number one.
Janet then began filming, Mr. Perry’s motion picture adaptation of Ntozake Shange’s Obie Award-winning play, “For Colored Girls,” for which Janet has received critical acclaim. She then headlined the opening night of the Essence Music Festival in New Orleans and followed this performance with a concert at Radio City Music Hall benefiting autism.

Summarizing her career and her incredibly raw albums, Janet has said, “Here I am. I’m coming on. Musically, I have it. You want it. And I’m giving it to you.” Continuing her growth as an artist and as a person Janet intriguingly states, “I’m proud to have stayed in the game and survived. And I’m proud that I’ve remained true to myself. But if you go back and listen to the music, you’ll hear how that self is always changing.”

DISCOGRAPHY:

Janet Jackson (1982)
Dream Street (1984)
Control (1986)
Janet Jackson’s Rhythm Nation 1814 (1989)
janet. (1993)
Design of a Decade (1996)
The Velvet Rope (1997)
All for You (2001)
Damita Jo (2004)
20 Y.O. (2006)
Discipline (2008)
Number Ones (2009)
“We Are the World 25 for Haiti” (2010)

Afficher la suite

Sexe
Femme
Site web

An Excerpt Henriette EKWE’s retrospective of 2011 on RFI…

Standard

Henriette Ekwe : «L’Union africaine semble être sous tutelle de l’Occident»

(DR)
Par RFI

Le 8 mars 2011, à l’occasion de la Journée de la femme, la journaliste camerounaise Henriette Ekwe a reçu à Washington le prix du Courage féminin 2011, décerné par le département d’Etat américain. Quel bilan tirer de l’année 2011 ? Est-ce une année exceptionnelle ?Au micro de Christophe Boisbouvier sur RFI, elle donne son point de vue, depuis Douala sur cette année vraiment pas comme les autres.

 

 

 
Henriette Ekwe, journaliste camerounaise

 
26/12/2011
par Christophe Boisbouvier
 
 

RFI : Est-ce que l’année 2011 restera dans l’histoire ?

Henriette Ekwe : Tout à fait. Pour moi oui, parce que nous avons eu les révolutions arabes qui ont montré que des peuples déterminés peuvent venir à bout des dictatures, même quand ces dictatures semblent soutenues par les grandes puissances occidentales. La deuxième chose, ce sont les bombardements en Côte d’Ivoire et en Libye où la solution politique n’était pas du tout acceptée par l’Occident et ce qui s’en est suivi. Et la troisième chose, ce sont ces oppositions qui sont allées récemment aux élections et qui ont appelé au secours la communauté internationale pour plus d’équité, pour la transparence. Je pense par exemple à l’opposition au Gabon qui n’a pas pu obtenir cet arbitrage-là et donc on a l’impression qu’il y a deux poids, deux mesures. L’Afrique est un peu désemparée face aux positions de l’Occident.

RFI : Quelle est l’image la plus forte que vous garderez de cette année ?

H. E. : Mon prix, qui m’a beaucoup impressionnée bien sûr (rires).

RFI : Le Prix du courage féminin que vous avez reçu à Washington des mains d’Hillary Clinton, la secrétaire d’Etat américaine ?

H. E. : Tout à fait. Et puis, évidemment ces femmes africaines qui ont eu le Prix Nobel de la paix, avec ceci de particulier que ce prix est plus souvent décerné à ceux qui ont la culture anglo-saxonne plutôt qu’aux francophones. Le Prix Nobel en Afrique revient le plus souvent à des hommes politiques ou à des personnalités africaines, mais plutôt de culture anglo-saxonne comme Desmond Tutu, Nelson Mandela, Kofi Annan, Wangari Maathai et aujourd’hui Ellen Johnson Sirleaf… et d’autres. C’est peut-être une particularité du Nobel.

RFI : Quelles sont les images qui vous ont choqué cette année ?

H. E. : La mort de Mouammar Kadhafi [ex-leader libyen, ndlr] bien sûr. La façon dont il a été traîné et exécuté sous l’œil d’un vidéaste amateur. Et puis, peut-être pas le transfert de Laurent Gbagbo [ancien président de Côte d’Ivoire, ndlr] à la Cour pénale internationale (CPI), mais la façon dont on l’a sorti de son bunker.

RFI : Mais certains disent que ces deux hommes l’ont cherché ?

H. E. : (rires). Je ne sais pas s’ils l’ont cherché parce que Kadhafi, je sais qu’il tenait la dragée haute à l’Occident. Mais les émissaires de l’Union africaine (UA) avaient proposé une sortie politique du conflit qui l’opposait à Benghazi. Et je pense qu’on aurait pu débarquer Kadhafi sans ces bombardements. Tout ça pour ça.

RFI : Et Laurent Gbagbo, est-ce qu’il ne l’a pas un petit peu cherché lui aussi ?

H. E. : A partir du moment où il a proposé le recomptage des voix, il ne l’a pas obtenu et puis je ne suis pas sûre que les droits de l’homme soient plus respectés sous Alassane Ouattara depuis qu’il est au pouvoir. Mais la façon dont lui et sa femme ont été traités, ce sont des images quand même qui touchent un peu les Africains et qui font penser que le panafricanisme est plus que jamais à l’ordre du jour, une réelle unité à l’Union africaine. Or l’Union africaine semble être sous tutelle et subir un peu ce que veut l’Occident. C’est dommage.

RFI : À un moment cette année, au vu des évènements au Cameroun, au Burkina Faso, on a cru que le vent du printemps arabe pouvait souffler jusqu’en Afrique subsaharienne. Et puis non, rien n’a changé. Est-ce que le « printemps arabe » a un effet chez vous ou pas du tout ?

H. E. : Ca a un effet. Lorsqu’on discute avec les gens, il y a un effet. Les gens se demandent dans la rue quand une telle étincelle pourrait avoir lieu. Le « printemps arabe » a de l’effet chez les intellectuels, chez les classes moyennes et chez les jeunes aussi, qui subissent un chômage massif. Maintenant, pratiquement, tout le monde a le câble, dans les villes notamment, et les jeunes regardent et suivent ce qui se passe là-bas avec beaucoup d’attention et d’intérêt. C’est certain.

RFI : Vous parliez du Gabon et du Cameroun. On pourrait aussi parler du Congo-Kinshasa ou du Congo-Brazzaville. Pourquoi y a-t-il alternance dans la plupart des pays d’Afrique de l’Ouest et pas dans les pays d’Afrique centrale ?

H. E. : Les pays d’Afrique centrale sont très riches. Les pays de la Cemac [Commission de la communauté économique et monétaire de l’Afrique centrale, ndlr], le golfe de Guinée, c’est un petit conglomérat d’émirats. Donc, les chefs d’Etat des pays du golfe de Guinée sont très riches et ils ont une capacité de corruption extraordinaire. S’ils font en sorte que les oppositions sont souvent glissantes, on ne sait pas très bien, on est ferme un moment et après on lorgne du côté du pouvoir. Donc, il y a une capacité de corruption assez importante. Il y a aussi le fait qu’en tant que réservoir de matières premières, ces pays sont souvent protégés par les pays occidentaux, les pays amis, les Etats-Unis pour un pays comme la Guinée équatoriale, la France pour le Gabon, le Cameroun et les autres. Et compte tenu de cela, même la répression dans ces pays n’aura pas le même retentissement qu’ailleurs. Je me souviens qu’en février 2008, il y a eu une répression féroce des marches des jeunes, mais on n’en a pas beaucoup parlé ! Par contre, au mois de septembre 2009 lorsque Moussa Dadis Camara fusille à peu près 150 personnes dans un stade à Conakry, tout de suite ça prend de l’ampleur. Le procureur de la Cour pénale internationale descend à Conakry etc… Mais dans les pays du Golfe de Guinée où il y a une répression constante, on n’a pas l’impression que cette répression a le même effet sur les pays amis, les pays occidentaux.

RFI : Le ministre français des Affaires étrangères, Alain Juppé, a jugé que la présidentielle d’octobre dernier dans votre pays, le Cameroun, était « acceptable ». Qu’en pensez-vous ?

H. E. : Là, il nous a choqués. Il faut se souvenir qu’Alain Juppé a été à l’époque du RPR délégué au congrès fondateur du RDPC [Rassemblement démocratique du peuple camerounais, ndlr] en 1985 à Bamenda. Il a des amis au Cameroun. Le fait de dire que c’était « acceptable » pour les Camerounais, c’était une insulte. C’était comme dire qu’on peut avoir une démocratie à deux vitesses et la nôtre serait la deuxième vitesse.

Jean II Makoun Quits the national football team….

Standard
Following the suspension placed on National team captain Samuel Eto’o FILS reprimanding him from playing 15 matches,some team mates have filed their resignation letters to the Cameroon Football Federation Authorities.
Jean II MAKOUN and Benoit ANGBWA dropped their resignation letters Tuesday December 27th 2011 at midday. This decision could however be altered pending the cancellation of Eto’s unjust suspension they say.
 
The National Team Captain has refused to plead guilty nor appeal the decision of the professional football management entity,saying footballers will speak when need be. This has kept football lovers in suspense who ponder on the raison d’etre of this grave decision penalising the National Team Captain,thus preventing him from playing the CAN eliminatories and the competition subsequently.
 
It should be noted that the suspension has not suspended Eto’s business strives as he launched his TeleCommunication network at the Douala Reunification stadium during a spectacular and giant concert starring one time Gabonese First Lady,now mother of the Present Gabonese president Ali BONGO,Patience DABANY,Cameroon’s Petit Pays and other African Music Emblems,thursday December 22nd 2011. Over 50 000 Cameroonians have already suscribed to the services,that will be officially launched come January 2012.
 
Camerooninas are in wait hoping that the suspension will  not take a drastic toll on the football performance of the Indomitable Lions in future encounters.

Cameroon’s tomorrow in Light….

Standard

It is exactly 4pm when activities orgainised to guide the book launch kick off.The ideas and success inclined perspectives were summarised in a short exposé by the author HIRAM Samuel IYODI,who stated his reasons for writing such a piece,at such a time,in a country where the reading culture has travelled far beyond.

The Journalists and Students present during the book launch threw thier worries open in a question and answer session moderated by a professional public speaker. The author elucidated the audience on the raison d’etre of  ‘Mes reves de Jeune’ in English, My dreams at youth,saying its an adamant call for youths to fasten their seat belts and take matters into their hands because the time to act is now. An aged person by name Mr MOUKOKO present during  the official release of HIRAM’s ‘Mes reves de Jeune’ saluted the young author’s effort in contributing to the nation’s growth,while yet lashed a bitter slap on the face of youths who according to him are not mature enough to handle matters because they still have milk teeth. Still speaking,he blamed the youths for the crisis because they spend time identifying themselves with foreign cultures,unaware of their existence, than their rich origins embedded in their traditional values so rich in colours and diversity.The wise man called on the younger generation to erase the conflictual barriers imposed between the old and the young,move closer to their parents and grand parents who are ready to nurture their brains with necessary tales that will mature them for tomorrow’s Challenges,hence gradually but surely introduce Cameroon’s tomorrow in light. The youths on their part blamed the culture vacancy on parents who have not taken time to drill their offsprings with their cultural accolades,so that they too can in turn pass on the legacy to the next generation subsequently.

 The Book Launch ended with the interesting debates serving an eye opener to both generations’ negligence towards one another. The author rounded off activities of the official release of ‘Mes reves de jeune’ at the GICAM conference hall with a call for both generations to read on and cultivate the ideologies by setting standards on the field for national growth & development of Africa in Miniature.