Mother Declares Her Children Are “the Biggest Regret of Her Life”

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Mother Declares Her Children Are “the Biggest Regret of Her Life”

By | Parenting – 17 hours ago
 

Let's talk about the mother who regrets her childrenLet’s talk about the mother who regrets her childrenLet’s talk about the mom who regrets her children. Last week, the Daily Mail published a first-person story by Isabella Dutton, a 57 year old mother of two who declared her children to be “the biggest regret of her life.” Since the Daily Mail is possibly the internet’s leading purveyor of “human interest in hating other humans” stories, it goes without saying that the article incited (and was intended to incite) a monstrous tsunami of scorn.

“A mother could never regret her children.” It’s a truism. But considering the life-altering effect of children on their mothers, it seems impossible that it could really be a universal truth. Isabella Dutton is clearly very unhappy. She feels trapped by the intense demands of her children, calling them parasites. I know lots of mothers who feel this way sometimes. But feeling like your kids are sucking your life force is one thing. Feeling like they “give nothing meaningful back in return”? That’s something different.

Related: 10 rules for bragging about your kids online

Dutton believes she simply lacked the wiring for motherhood. She never wanted kids, but didn’t want to deny her husband the experience. But then she says some things that make me wonder whether her feelings might have as much to do with the choices she made as a parent than her choice to be a parent in the first place.

Like this:

“I cannot understand mothers who insist they want children – especially those who undergo years of fertility treatment – then race back to work at the earliest opportunity after giving birth, leaving the vital job of caring for them to strangers…Why have them at all if you don’t want to bring them up, or can’t afford to? And why pretend you wanted them if you have no intention of raising them? This hypocrisy is, in my view, far more pernicious and difficult to fathom than my own admission that my life would have been better without children.

And here, perhaps, is the nub of it: I would not take on the job of motherhood and do it half-heartedly.”

Harsh judgment from a happy mother. But when the woman who’s doling it out has written a newspaper article about how her kids have ruined her life, it’s a huge head-smack. What could be more “half-hearted” than devoting decades to caring for children and hating every minute of it? If this woman had been willing to enlist help, she would have had time to do the things she craved. Instead, she sacrificed her happiness in the interest of an idea about how to be a good mother. Maybe if she had been able to compromise her ironclad standards to meet a few of her own needs along the way, she might have a more balanced view of the parenting experience. And maybe not feel compelled to negate her children in a major newspaper (with photos, no less).

There’s an interesting conversation about this happening at The Hairpin, where Nicole Cliffe says she’s glad to see someone acknowledge the fact that children are not for everyone. A bunch of people thought this confession was a relief. Some even said the writer reminded them of their own mothers. Quite a few of them were totally ok with that, and said they respected their mothers more for being so honest. I wonder whether Isabella Dutton’s kids feel the same way.

– By Rebecca Odes
Follow Rebecca at Babble

Online Certificates From Tufts University: Humanitarian Assistance & Delivery Science

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Online Certificates From Tufts University: Humanitarian Assistance & Delivery Science

The Friedman School recognizes the need for working professionals to pursue continued education while maintaining their current positions. Many early to mid-career professionals find themselves in rewarding positions, but require the targeted knowledge found in the Friedman School Nutrition Certificates.

The Friedman School currently offers the following certificates designed to meet the needs of professionals who wish to deepen their knowledge in order to advance in their careers.

Each certificate is made up of three courses. All courses are all taught online by Tufts faculty, and every course is held to the same academic standards and rigor as those taught live on the Boston campus. The certificate takes one year to complete (Fall, Spring, and Summer).

Additionally, both Tufts and the United Nations University confer the certificate in Delivery Science for International Nutrition. Recipients of the certificates receive an enhanced level of recognition by virtue of the standings of both institutions.

More…

The Friedman School also offers certificates in “Healthy Communities” and “Nutrition Communications in addition to a blended-learning (online with intensive residencies) and our seven residential degree programs.

Graduate Certificate Courses and Continuing Education at Friedman

Through advanced teaching pedagogies and robust software platforms, students in our certificate programs are taught fully online over one year through three 16-week semesters. Students are from around the globe and learn from the school’s renowned faculty, collaborate and network with fellow students, and receive superior career-advancing instruction on a schedule that fits the demands of today’s professionals.

Tufts has mastered the art of distance learning with proven educational experiences that are recognized as being equally as enriching as the traditional classroom. On average, students need 8-12 hours each week to do the work required for each course.

Students who earn certificates will have the ability to apply their courses toward electives at the Friedman School should they decide to pursue a masters degree. (Please consult with the Office of Admissions for full details in applying for individual degree programs).

Admissions…

Visit the school’s website for full information — or contact me directly to be put in contact with the appropriate program director.

Online Certificates From Tufts University: Humanitarian Assistance & Delivery Science

Standard

Online Certificates From Tufts University: Humanitarian Assistance & Delivery Science

The Friedman School recognizes the need for working professionals to pursue continued education while maintaining their current positions. Many early to mid-career professionals find themselves in rewarding positions, but require the targeted knowledge found in the Friedman School Nutrition Certificates.

The Friedman School currently offers the following certificates designed to meet the needs of professionals who wish to deepen their knowledge in order to advance in their careers.

Each certificate is made up of three courses. All courses are all taught online by Tufts faculty, and every course is held to the same academic standards and rigor as those taught live on the Boston campus. The certificate takes one year to complete (Fall, Spring, and Summer).

Additionally, both Tufts and the United Nations University confer the certificate in Delivery Science for International Nutrition. Recipients of the certificates receive an enhanced level of recognition by virtue of the standings of both institutions.

More…

The Friedman School also offers certificates in “Healthy Communities” and “Nutrition Communications in addition to a blended-learning (online with intensive residencies) and our seven residential degree programs.

Graduate Certificate Courses and Continuing Education at Friedman

Through advanced teaching pedagogies and robust software platforms, students in our certificate programs are taught fully online over one year through three 16-week semesters. Students are from around the globe and learn from the school’s renowned faculty, collaborate and network with fellow students, and receive superior career-advancing instruction on a schedule that fits the demands of today’s professionals.

Tufts has mastered the art of distance learning with proven educational experiences that are recognized as being equally as enriching as the traditional classroom. On average, students need 8-12 hours each week to do the work required for each course.

Students who earn certificates will have the ability to apply their courses toward electives at the Friedman School should they decide to pursue a masters degree. (Please consult with the Office of Admissions for full details in applying for individual degree programs).

Admissions…

Visit the school’s website for full information — or contact me directly to be put in contact with the appropriate program director.

Starting April 15th — Online Certificate Course in Digital Organizing and Open Government

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Starting April 15th — Online Certificate Course in Digital Organizing and Open Government

Hi PCDN Folks!

One final reminder that my colleagues and I at TechChange have an online certificate course coming up on Digital Organizing and Open Government (course description included below). The course will run from April 15th – May 10th. 
 
We’ve got an amazing line-up of guest experts and have a few more seats left so feel free to circulate to your colleagues if you think they might be interested. Should be a great course. Use the code “PCDN” and get an additional discount of $100!
Cheers,
Nick 

***

TC104: Digital Organizing and Open Government (April 15th – May 10th)

Technological innovation is transforming civil society organization and creating new opportunities for government accountability. This four-week online professional development certificate course will evaluate case studies where new technologies have been used for activism and what factors and contexts are most influential on outcomes. It will also provide participants with strategies for maximizing the impact of new media and train them in the effective use of analysis and message management tools.

Speakers:

  • Kaushal Jhalla, World Bank
  • Linda Raftree, Plan International, USA
  • Barak Hoffman, Georgetown University

Topics & Tech:

  • Communicating Online: Social Media Analytics and Outreach
  • Simple Tools for Big Data: Sunlight Labs and Accountable Congress
  • Building an Engaged Public: CrowdHall and Online Discussions
  • Open Government Partnerships and Local Connections: How to Open Your Government
Cost:
  • Full course cost: $445
  • Use “PCDN” as a discount code: $345

Fragile States Working Group Meetin – April 17, 2013, 11am

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Dear Fragile States Working Group members and friends,

We are pleased to announce a special opportunity for the next Fragile States Working Group meeting on April 17th. Representatives of the Civil Society Platform for Peacebuilding and Statebuilding (CSPPS), which is the global Southern-Northern civil society coalition engaging donor and host-nation governments in the processes of implementing the New Deal for Engagement in Fragile States endorsed in Busan in 2011, will join the Working Group to discuss progress in the New Deal over the past year, and the challenges and successes that civil society has faced in engaging in the New Deal process in challenging political environments.

 We also have the opportunity to hold the next Working Group meeting in conjunction with the Annual Members Conference of the Alliance for Peacebuilding (AfP), the umbrella network of NGOs, universities, and practitioners working in conflict resolution and peacebuilding around the world. It will offer a chance for Working Group members to meet other peacebuilding experts within AfP’s membership and discuss the unique challenges facing fragile societies and the efforts underway to reform international aid and development strategies in fragile contexts.  

The next meeting will take place on April 17th from 11:00am – 12:30pm at NAFSA: Association of International Educators; 1307 New York Ave, NW, Washington, DC 20005. The agenda is below.

Please click here to RSVP.

Meeting Agenda:

  1. Introduction of representatives of the Civil Society Platform for Peacebuilding and Statebuilding (CSPPS). Brief remarks by representatives of the CSPPS, including New Deal implementation in the Democratic Republic of Congo, the development of country-specific and global shared indicators to measure progress, and the scope and objectives of the CSPPS.
    1. Georges TSHIONZA MATA, Coordonnateur Régional, PREGESCO, Democratic Republic of the Congo
    2. Erin McCandless, Senior Advisor, Interpeace; Chief Editor,  Journal of Peacebuilding and Development; Part-time faculty, Graduate Program in International Affairs, the New School. United States
    3. Peter van Sluijs, IDPS Coordinator, Cordaid, The Netherlands
    4. Nicolas Bouchet, IDPS Consultant to Cordaid, France
  2. Update on two side events being organized by the CSPPS around the April 19th Global Meeting of the International Dialogue for Peacebuilding and Statebuilding in Washington.
    1. Melanie Greenberg, President and CEO, Alliance for Peacebuilding, United States
  3. Discussion: How can international civil society help ensure peacebuilding and statebuilding strategies in fragile societies are appropriate and successful? What are specific ways outside non-governmental actors can support local civil society’s engagement with and ownership of such strategies?  

If you would like more information about the Fragile States Working Group or about the upcoming meeting, please contact Melanie Greenberg, President and CEO of the Alliance for Peacebuilding and Co-Chair of the working group: melaniecg@allianceforpeacebuilding.org

Amherst Declaration of Global Citizenship

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 The sponsors of the Amherst Declaration of Global Citizenship invite other NGOs, universities, and international peace and development research institutions to become co-sponsors of the  Declaration. The Amherst Declaration reflects the fact that in an increasingly intercconected many of us have incorporated a global identity into who we are. This does not mean that we need to abandon our identities with our countries or  communities. Rather it means that we have an added global layer of civic responsibility, and that we recognize the 21st century necessity of building a sustainable, values-based world community. The current organizational sponsors of the Amherst Declaration invite other organizations from around the world to join us a co-sponsors. Our goal is to demonstrate to world leaders the depth and breadth of institutional and individual commitment to global citizenship, and of the urgent need for people and organizations to work more collaboratively together to solve the growing list of issues that face our planet. 

Attached is a description of the Amherst Declaration. If your organization is interested in becoming a Declaration co-sponsor please contact Ron Israel, Executive Director, The Global Citizens’ Initiative (TGCI): Email address: Roncisrael@gmail.com.

Funding Available: Alliance for Global Good, Innovation Fund Round 2

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Funding Available: Alliance for Global Good, Innovation Fund Round 2

Cross-posted from Innovation Fund:  http://afgg.org/?page_id=1404

Innovation Fund Round 2/Application Process

We’ve tried to make the application process clear and convenient!

First, get the Request for Proposals and review it to make sure that you’re eligible.

Assuming you are, then check out the Instructions for the Application. 

Really, check them out:Applicants are strongly encouraged to review the Application Instructions and the worksheet included there carefully before beginning the Application Form.  You can also download the instructions and worksheet in Microsoft Word if that’s more
convenient.


When you’re ready, complete the application.  Note that the deadline for application is  5 PM on May 31, 2013.

If you have questions about the RFP or the application process, participate in our conference call/webinar at Noon (EST) on April 22, 2013Participation requires registration. 

The list of questions raised will be circulated to all those registered no less than 24 hours before the call, together with relevant call-in information.   Questions submitted April 18, 2013, including those raised during the call, will be addressed on the call if time permits.   Responses to questions not answered on the call will be addressed in in a subsequent distribution.

Eligibility Criteria
An eligible organization has identified a clear strategy for mission-relevant, revenue generating activity and conducted enough of the needed preliminaries (e.g., studies, technical assistance, market analysis, etc.) to have in place a mature strategy for execution, all as reflected in a solid business plan, so that Innovation Fund resources will be used for implementation.  An eligible organization also:

  • is a 501(c)3 organization in the United States (including so called “friends of” and US fiscal agents for non-U.S. NGOs);
  • is engaged in in areas of health, education, environment, poverty and/or world relations outside the United States;
  • can demonstrate in quantitative terms the concrete impact it has made in addressing the problems it  targets;
  • can demonstrate organizational stability using information that might include but is not limited to: a) years of operation; b) relatively stable revenue; c) testimonial(s), e.g., from recurring donor(s); and/or d) cumulative impact;
  •  has had total revenue over the past five years that:
    •        averaged below $20,000,000, and above $5,000,000 per year, and
    •        derived in a significant part from at least one type of traditional funding (e.g.,     charitable giving, government support, investment income); and
  • has quality systems of governance and financial accountability.